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fifteen squeaks less

fernando ortega
kurimanzutto
october 11 - november 12, 2004
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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

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fifteen squeaks less, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2004

At kurimanzutto, Fernando Ortega shows a new series of works dealing with the cracks and squeaks produced when walking on the gallery‘s wood floor.


Quince rechinidos menos/Fifteen squeaks less, as its title indicates, Ortega located fifteen cracks and squeaks by walking on the floor and “eliminated” them by cutting and extracting the precise area that produced the sound. The act of “canceling” the areas of noise created a new conscience of the sounds that were unnoticed in the space.


In a similar equation, for Sin título/Untitled, Ortega cut out a phrase from the book “Un homme qui dort” by George Perec that talks obsessively about the squeaks created by the wooden beams of a floor. The books were found in several public and school libraries in Mexico City. A positive-negative dialogue with the floor intervention is provoked.


Finally, two framed newspaper clippings preserved by the artist related to the loss of voice of singer celebrities (Afonías/Aphonia) are inserted as noise instigators in the exhibition.