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leonor antunes in machines à penser

fondazione prada - venice
may 26 – november 25, 2018
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leonor antunes, installation view machines à penser, fondazione prada, venice, 2018. 

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leonor antunes, installation view machines à penser, fondazione prada, venice, 2018. 

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leonor antunes, installation view machines à penser, fondazione prada, venice, 2018. 

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leonor antunes, installation view machines à penser, fondazione prada, venice, 2018. 

image

leonor antunes, installation view machines à penser, fondazione prada, venice, 2018. 

image

leonor antunes, installation view machines à penser, fondazione prada, venice, 2018. 

image

leonor antunes, installation view machines à penser, fondazione prada, venice, 2018. 

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leonor antunes, installation view machines à penser, fondazione prada, venice, 2018. 

Fondazione Prada presents the exhibition Machines à penser, curated by Dieter Roelstraete, a project that explores the correlation between the conditions of exile, escape and withdrawal and the physical or mental places that favor reflection, thought and intellectual production.

 

Machines à penser focuses on three fundamental figures of twentieth century philosophy: Theodor W. Adorno (1903-1969), Martin Heidegger (1889 - 1976) and Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951). As Dieter Roelstraete maintains: " these spaces the three protagonists of the exhibition gave birth to their deepest thoughts. Isolation, whether it was chosen or imposed, seems to have greatly influenced thought. Over the years their homes have proved an inexhaustible source of inspiration for many generations of artists attracted by the fantasy of retreat, materialized in these elementary architectural archetypes ".

 

The exhibition is on the ground floor and on the first floor of the eighteenth-century building in an immersive journey that deepens the figures of the three thinkers and the relationship between philosophy, art and architecture. Inside the reconstruction of the small house of Wittgenstein in Skjolden in Norway the only sculpture created by the Austro-British philosopher, Head of a girl (1925-1928), together with some of his personal objects is exhibited. The self-imposed exile of Wittgenstein and his constant search for a state of spiritual peace are the inspiration behind the work of the Norwegian collective composed of Sebastian Makonnen Kjølaas, Marianne Bredesen and Siri Hjorth, of the artist and intellectual Jeremy Millar and by photographer Guy Moreton. Also on show is a work by Leonor Antunes and a sculpture by Mark Manders.


 

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