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abraham cruzvillegas the water trilogy 3 autoconclusion

Ideologically Inconsistent Identity: Jetties, Gutters & Urinals
Sensory spaces 12 - museum boijmans van beuningen - Rotterdam
October 14, 2017 - January 28, 2018
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the water trilogy 3: autoconclusion: ideologically inconsistent identity: jetties, gutters & urinals, museum boijmans van veuningen, rotterdam, 2017.

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sensory spaces 12, museum boijmans van veuningen, rotterdam, 2017.

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the water trilogy 3: autoconclusion: ideologically inconsistent identity: jetties, gutters & urinals, museum boijmans van veuningen, rotterdam, 2017.

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the water trilogy 3: autoconclusion: ideologically inconsistent identity: jetties, gutters & urinals, museum boijmans van veuningen, rotterdam, 2017.

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the water trilogy 3: autoconclusion: ideologically inconsistent identity: jetties, gutters & urinals, museum boijmans van veuningen, rotterdam, 2017.

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sensory spaces 12, museum boijmans van veuningen, rotterdam, 2017.

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the water trilogy 3: autoconclusion: ideologically inconsistent identity: jetties, gutters & urinals, museum boijmans van veuningen, rotterdam, 2017.

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the water trilogy 3: autoconclusion: ideologically inconsistent identity: jetties, gutters & urinals, museum boijmans van veuningen, rotterdam, 2017.

Abraham Cruzvillegas presents ‘The Water Trilogy 3: Autoconclusion: Ideologically Inconsistent Identity: Jetties, Gutters & Urinals’ for the solo exhibition series at Museum Boijmas van Beuningen, Sensory Spaces 12His intervetion is the third chapter of ‘The Water Trilogy’, which had been previously presented in Paris and Tokyo. The starting point for this trilogy is Lake Pátzcuaro in Mexico, which is slowly disappearing due to climate change, overfishing, deforestation and pollution. Cruzvillegas reflects on this location and on universal ecological problems.

 

Cruzvillegas always incorporates an element of life in his work, whether this is a dance performed on top of the installation (Carré d’Art, Nîmes, 2016–2017), a bulb of garlic that rots away or sprouts during the exhibition (Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris, 2017), a mass of soil in which plants start to grow over time (Tate Modern, London, 2015), a little axolotl salamander in a water tank (Hérmes Foudation, Tokyo, 2017), or a piece of music performed in the presentation (as in the three parts of this trilogy). Within the installation in Rotterdam three musicians sing a song in the traditional ‘huasteco’ style of music, named after the Huasteca region in the northeast of Mexico. The trio uses traditional instruments, but does not always play them with their fingers; sometimes they use a sickle, dagger or machete. Here Cruzvillegas is alluding also to Mexico’s history and struggles: the toil, the fields, revolution and emancipation, as well as the disappearance of these ideals.

 

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